Qualification

SCQF Level 8

Duration

40 Hours over 6 Months

Starts

30 Aug 2019

Fees

£125

Interests

  • Engineering

Why take this course?

This Unit has been designed to allow candidates to develop a knowledge and understanding of electrical motor drive systems at both a systems level and at individual component level (e.g. transmission arrangements, electrical protection and starting and braking methods). Candidates will also have an opportunity to consolidate their knowledge of electrical motor drive systems by undertaking an investigation of the reasons for the selection of the component parts in a practical industrial or commercial drive system. On completion of the Unit, candidates should be able to:
  1. Outline factors that influence choice of motor to drive an industrial load
  2. Distinguish different forms of motor to load power transmission systems
  3. Analyse electrical protection arrangements used with electrical motors
  4. Analyse starting/braking arrangements associated with electric motors
  5. Investigate selecting motor and ancillary equipment for industrial loads.

What you will experience

It is important to recognise that an electrical motor is normally part of an overall system which drives a given load. The system will also contain some form of mechanical transmission arrangement (e.g. a coupling, pulley or gearbox) to transmit the motor’s torque to the load. The system will have electrical protection to protect the motor against adverse electrical and mechanical conditions and both starting and braking arrangements to start and stop the motor.

In this Unit you will first consider electrical motor drive systems at a system’s level and then you will look in greater depth at individual parts of the system (e.g. transmission systems, electrical protection and starting and braking methods). You will also be provided with an opportunity to consolidate your knowledge and understanding of motor drive systems by undertaking an investigation of motor and ancillary equipment for a given industrial load.

There are plenty of good learning materials available both in paper format and via the Internet on motor drive systems and the component parts of these systems. Your lecturer is likely to strongly encourage you to explore manufacturers’ catalogues, datasheets and investigate Internet sites to find out more about motor drive systems and their component parts.

Assessment for this Unit will comprise of a two hour written test following the delivery of Outcomes 1 to 4 followed by an Assignment in which you will have an opportunity to investigate the selection of motor, transmission system, electrical protection and starting and braking methods in an industrial or commercial electrical motor drive system.